Discover Ancient Powers

The Giza Pyramids in Caïro, wikipedia.org.

Back in the old Egyptian dynasties there were no railways invented yet, nevertheless majestic pieces of architecture were build. As of today archeologists still have not figured out how the ancient Egyptians were able to transport massive blocks of rock that were used for building Pyramids and Temples. The Pyramids of Giza, Valley of the Kings & Queens, Abu Simbel, Temple of Karnak are amongst the most popular architectural sights in Egypt, each of them being absolutely mindblowing and flabbergasting. Thé perfect starting point to kickstart your African Adventure.

Egypt is often referred to as the “Gift of the Nile“. The Nile provided an outstandingly crucial role in the development of the Egyptian civilization. Along the banks of the Nile vegetation was cultivated, while the majority of the surrounding lands was desert. Hence it’s no wonder that the most developed cities nowadays are located directly along the river, such as Aswan, Caïro and Luxor. In fact the Nile was thát special for Egypt that they even based their original calender on the cycles of the river. You can create one awesome itinerary with daily trains from Alexandria to Aswan, along the nile, passing by the most renowned Egyptian sights. In fact, most sights are even in walking distance of the major train stations, such as the Temple of Karnak and the Pyramids of Giza. I doubt whether there is a better transport system to experience Egypt… if you do happen to find one… let me know! It is worth to notice that the Egyptian Railways often do not want to sell tickets to tourists for specific trains (“safety reasons”). However, once you have a ticket for those trains it’s all of a sudden no issue! Worst case scenario ask a local to buy the tickets for you (e.g. via couchsurfing).

Egypt has só much to offer in terms of history and archeological highlights that you’ll likely won’t want to leave the country to travel further. Want to experience even more ancient history but then less tourist-crowded? (Egypt is one of the most popular tourist destinations). Follow the Nile south to Sudan, with the popular Nile Steamer from Aswan to Wadi Halfa.

– The fare between Aswan and Cairo in “1st class” (seat) is 10 euro.
– The fare between Aswan and Cairo in “2nd class” (seat) is 5 euro.
– The fare between Alexandria and Cairo in “1st class” (seat) is 3 euro.
– The fare between Alexandria and Cairo in “2nd class” (seat) is 1 euro.
– The fare between Aswan and Wadi Halfa in “1st class” (sleeper) is 20 euro.
– The fare between Aswan and Wadi Halfa in “2nd class” (deck) is 10 euro.
– The fare between Khartoum and Wadi Halfa in “1st class” (sleeper) is 25 euro.
– The fare between Khartoum and Wadi Halfa in “1st class” (seat) is 15 euro.
– The fare between Khartoum and Wadi Halfa in “2nd class” (seat) is 10 euro.

Train 914
(↓)
daily
Train 907
(↑)
daily
Train 980
(↓)
daily
Train 983
(↑)
daily
Nile Steamer
(↓)
Sun
Nile Steamer
(↑)
Mon
Train
(↓)
3th Tue
Train
(↑)
3th Sat
Alexandria (Egypt) dep/arr 13:00 16:00
Cairo (Egypt) dep 16:20 13:00 08:00 21:30
El-Giza dep 08:25 21:10
Luxor dep 18:25 10:55
Aswan (Egypt) dep/arr 21:50 07:30 12:00 13:00
Wadi Halfa (Sudan) dep/arr 08:00 17:00 17:40 23:30
Abu Hamad dep 00:00 19:00
Berber dep 15:00 05:00
Atbara dep/arr 18:00 02:00
Ad-Damir dep 19:00 23:00
Shendi dep 04:00 17:00
Khartoum (Sudan) dep/arr 12:00 09:00

Entering Egypt requires you to have a visa on forehand or buy one on arrival. A single-entry visa will cost around 20 euro’s. It is also convenient to know that you can enter the country if you have visited Israel. If you enter enter Egypt through the Sinai area and do not leave the the area (e.g. Sharm el-Seikh) you do not need a visa.

It is highly advised to read all details at lonelyplanet.

Paintings in the Horemheb tomb, offbeattravelling.com.


Jebel Elba seen from Wadi Sremtai, http://picssr.com/photos/ganay_elba.


Temple of Karnak (Luxor), http://spirittourism.com.


The famous Mount Sinai, http://www.tvcresources.net.


A Felucca down the Nile, https://www.tripsavvy.com